i'm your density

I'm Christina.
Cis female, aro ace, Scottish. 20 years old

idiopath-fic-smile:

I think at some point pilf & co were talking about how Combeferre is not necessarily the sane one of the group and then this happened, with no context other than I guess it’s a modern AU?

"I’m just saying," said Combeferre, "as someone who has maybe a little more common sense than you—"

Enjolras sighed. “Combeferre,” he said, “remember that time you dropped acid out of medical curiosity?”

"We had to put you in the bathtub because you kept taking your pants off," Courfeyrac added helpfully. "Bahorel overheard you promising a pencil you were going to liberate it back into being a tree."

They gave him a moment to let that sink in. Combeferre did remember that night, vaguely. It had been interesting but his notes were unhelpful to say the least.

"Okay," said Combeferre, "but considering I’m not on acid right now—”

(via doeskin-pantaloons)

winterfuckingsoldier:

imaginebucky:

imagine bucky and natasha whispering behind steve’s back in russian, just little harmless things like “he’s cute when he’s angry” and “if you tell him he’s got a nice ass he’ll turn the color of your hair” so steve decides he’s gonna learn some russian so he can understand what they’re saying about him, but it has an unintended side effect. bucky mumbles in his sleep when he’s restless, sometimes english or spanish or japanese, but most often in russian. usually it’s a litany of “don’t make me don’t make me please stop don’t make me i don’t want to” but every now and then it’ll be something along the lines of “begging for your life won’t make a fucking difference to me” and steve can’t decide which is worse

 (via sebuttchinstan)

(via refrigeratorsrock)

i’m not saying bucky should spend most of cap 3 crying and kissing steve, but i am saying they’d be smart to play to sebastian stan’s strengths

(Source: briecheesie, via assbutts-in-isengard)

I’m with you till the end of the line.

(Source: bfals, via i-was-so-alone-i-owe-you-so-much)

CA:TWS, as a film, was a fantastic exercise in putting genuinely decent and optimistic characters (except for Steve himself, at this point, but we can go into that later) up against a nearly ripped-from-the-headlines plot that distills a lot of this country’s cynicism and negativity, particularly in my age group. More than any of the other MCU films, I think this was aimed directly at us, the people in our late teens and twenties and early thirties who sometimes start crying on the toilet because not only will we never be able to stop working our terrible service-industry jobs, we will also never be able to make a safe and comfortable world for the kids who come after us, or take care of our parents when they need us. On top of all that, we’re in this lame dystopian surveillance society where the government hates us, military force has taken the place of diplomacy and stuff like drone warfare is something we’re supposed to just accept, like it’s not horrifying. It’s a story specifically for my generation to try and find some solidarity with.

Which is a pretty ballsy play for a movie with a main character that’s 95.

saddeer:

zkac:

what’s Whitney Houston’s favorite type of coordination?

HAAAAAAAAAND EYEEEEEEEEEE

i hate this i hate u 

(via revolutamis)

pvwitch:

In case you were having a bad day, here are some kitten feet

(Source: catsbeaversandducks, via hurleyxox)

vastderp:

rainbowbarnacle:

aprilwitching:

erotica written by an alien pretending not to be horrified by the human body

"some sort of gel emerged"

AHAHAHA OH WOW


“Together they put all of their clothes in a pile on the floor, where the dog lives.”

MY GOD

(via justsomekidfrommilfay)

pilferingapples:

aphraseremains:

I don’t know why they keep giving Bahorel’s lines to other people, but here it results in Joly trying to tell a rather uninterested Bossuet all about how great Musichetta is, and Bossuet finally giving in and advising tight pants, so I think I can cope.

And then there is Bossuet’s funeral oration for Blondeau! Which is excellent.

I’ve definitely reblogged this, but I finally got to SEE this clip and
OH GEEZ JOLY AND BOSSUET
I have never seen them played so appropriately in anything ever, and SOMEONE PLEASE TELL ME THIS EXISTS WITH SUBTITLES because I need to know every single line here.

hollabackboston:

roses—and—rue:

Zitkala-Ša, also known as Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, was the most amazing woman you’ve never heard of.
A writer, editor, musician, teacher and political activist, she was born on February 22, 1876 on the Yankton Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Her mother was Sioux and her father, who abandoned the family when she was very young, was European-American.
When she was eight, missionaries came to the res and took Zitkala-Ša along with several other children to the White’s Manual Labor Institute in Wabash, Indiana, one of many such institutions where Native children were forced to assimilate into white American culture. She studied piano and violin and eventually took the place of her teacher when she resigned. When she received her diploma in 1895, she delivered a speech on women’s rights.
She earned a scholarship to Earlham College, where she continued to study music. From 1897-99, she played with the New England Conservatory in Boston and played at the Paris Exposition in 1900. She collaborated with composer William F. Hanson on the world’s first Native American opera, based entirely on Sioux melodies that had previously existed only as oral tradition. She would play the melodies and Hanson transcribed them. The Sun Dance Opera debuted in 1913 to warm reviews, but I can find no recordings of it, and it seems it’s never performed.
Zitkala-Ša also wrote a number of collections of Native American stories and legends. She wrote them in Latin when she was at school and then translated them into English. She was the first Native person to do so in her own words, without a white editor or translator. In addition, she wrote extensively about her schooling and how it left her torn between her Sioux heritage and her assimilation into white culture. Her writings were published in The Atlantic Monthly and in Harper’s and she served as editor for the American Indian Magazine.
Unsurprisingly, most of her writings were political. She was a fierce yet charismatic advocate for Native American rights. Her efforts helped pass the Indian Citizenship Act and the Indian Reorganization Act. Having founded the National Coalition of American Indians, she spent the rest of her life fighting to protect our many indigenous communities from exploitation.
Her accomplishments were incredible- but have you ever heard of her? I had never heard of her either. Just another example of a history-changing woman omitted from the history books.

hollabackboston:

roses—and—rue:

Zitkala-Ša, also known as Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, was the most amazing woman you’ve never heard of.

A writer, editor, musician, teacher and political activist, she was born on February 22, 1876 on the Yankton Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Her mother was Sioux and her father, who abandoned the family when she was very young, was European-American.

When she was eight, missionaries came to the res and took Zitkala-Ša along with several other children to the White’s Manual Labor Institute in Wabash, Indiana, one of many such institutions where Native children were forced to assimilate into white American culture. She studied piano and violin and eventually took the place of her teacher when she resigned. When she received her diploma in 1895, she delivered a speech on women’s rights.

She earned a scholarship to Earlham College, where she continued to study music. From 1897-99, she played with the New England Conservatory in Boston and played at the Paris Exposition in 1900. She collaborated with composer William F. Hanson on the world’s first Native American opera, based entirely on Sioux melodies that had previously existed only as oral tradition. She would play the melodies and Hanson transcribed them. The Sun Dance Opera debuted in 1913 to warm reviews, but I can find no recordings of it, and it seems it’s never performed.

Zitkala-Ša also wrote a number of collections of Native American stories and legends. She wrote them in Latin when she was at school and then translated them into English. She was the first Native person to do so in her own words, without a white editor or translator. In addition, she wrote extensively about her schooling and how it left her torn between her Sioux heritage and her assimilation into white culture. Her writings were published in The Atlantic Monthly and in Harper’s and she served as editor for the American Indian Magazine.

Unsurprisingly, most of her writings were political. She was a fierce yet charismatic advocate for Native American rights. Her efforts helped pass the Indian Citizenship Act and the Indian Reorganization Act. Having founded the National Coalition of American Indians, she spent the rest of her life fighting to protect our many indigenous communities from exploitation.

Her accomplishments were incredible- but have you ever heard of her? I had never heard of her either. Just another example of a history-changing woman omitted from the history books.

(via pilferingapples)

This scene didn't make it into the movie for some reason

Valjean:

Marius I stole a loaf of bread like 30 years ago I'm on the run

Marius:

omg that's terrible

Cosette -walks in- OH HEY GUUUUUUUYS GOOD MORNING

Marius:

go away plz

Cosette:

you're talking politics whatevs I'll just listen

Marius:

rly go it's be sooo boring

Cosette:

your tie is nice today sweetie I won't be bored

Marius:

it's business we have to be alone

Cosette:

r u fuckin kidding me papa look at this LOOK AT THIS. MY HUSBAND BEATS ME AND YOU HAVE TO KISS ME AND DEFEND ME AND SAY SOMETHING GOD YOU'RE SO AWKWARD PAPA.

Marius:

COSETTE WHAT

Valjean:

-kisses her forehead-

Marius:

you have to go

Cosette:

look at me Marius I'm pretty today

Marius:

okay yeah you are ily

Cosette:

ily2 and I'm staying

Marius:

NO.

Cosette:

OH WHAT YOU'RE GONNA USE YOUR MAN VOICE ON ME

Cosette:

FINE. I'M GONNA GO AND YOU'RE GONNA BE THE BORED ONES AAAAAHAHAHAHAHAAHAHAAAAAAA.

Cosette:

I'M GONNA TELL YOUR GRANDFATHER ON YOU YOU TYRANTS

Cosette -slams door-

...

Cosette:

-opens door-

Cosette:

I AM VERY ANGRY BTW

Cosette:

-slams door again-

In the delivery room

tokomon:

mother: is it a boy or a girl?

doctor: *puts baby between teeth* it’s a metaphor

(via genderneutron)

(Source: queencersei, via genderneutron)